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Oldswinford C of E Primary School

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Oldswinford C of E Primary School

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Our School

Who Are We?

​We are a Church of England, voluntary controlled primary school nestled in the heart of Oldswinford. Larger than the average primary school, we are two-form entry and have 420 children who start their learning journey with us at 4 years of age in the Foundation Stage. At the end of Year 6, we are always so proud of the way our pupils have progressed and fondly wave them off to secondary school at the grand old age of 11, where we hope they will portray and share the Oldswinford spirit. Our dedicated team of staff and governors (more than 60 in total!) work hard to give the children the very best deal that we possibly can.

 


Our History

Oldswinford was a parish in its own right in the county of Worcester. Its name is derived from the Old English (Anglo-Saxon) Swine Ford - which can be translated as Pig Ford. The river in question was the Stour. It is this historical fact that inspires the logo of our school badge:

 

Swinford is mentioned in a Saxon charter of 950 AD [spelt Suineforde]. It is also mentioned in William the Conqueror's Doomsday Survey when the manor was in the possession of William Fitz Ansculf a powerful Norman Lord who resided in his hilltop castle at Dudley. 'Old' was added to Swynford to distinguish it from the adjacent Swinford Regis.

 

Old Swinford Church Schools [originally housing a Boys, a Girls and a mixed Infants School] was opened in the Spring of 1860 in School Street (later renamed Craufurd Street). The three departments remained separate for 79 years until September 1939 when they were amalgamated and renamed Old Swinford Junior and Mixed Infants. In 1967, the infant and junior departments were separated when the juniors moved to a new building in Field Lane and named Oldswinford Church of England Junior School. Ten years later in 1977, the infants moved out of the original 1860 building into mobile classrooms on Field Lane, thus creating Oldswinford Church of England Primary School. June 2000 was the official opening of a permanent building for the infants, alongside the junior building.

 

 

 

Why do we name our Omega Phase classes

‘Craufurd’ and ‘Field?’

 

Old Swinford Church Schools [originally housing a Boys, a Girls and a mixed Infants School] was opened in the Spring of 1860 in School Street (later renamed Craufurd Street). The three departments remained separate for 79 years until September 1939 when they were amalgamated and renamed Old Swinford Junior and Mixed Infants. In 1967, the infant and junior departments were separated when the juniors moved to a new building in Field Lane and named Oldswinford Church of England Junior School. Ten years later in 1977, the infants moved out of the original 1860 building into mobile classrooms on Field Lane, thus creating Oldswinford Church of England Primary School. June 2000 was the official opening of a permanent building for the infants, alongside the junior building.

 
   

Why do we name our Alpha Phase classes

‘Crystal’ and ‘Lion?’

The Stourbridge area has been a major glassmaking centre for 400 years and there is still a thriving industry in Stourbridge today. Not only was it the lifeblood of the community, but also a substantial contributor to Britain's manufacturing strength and national wealth. It is recognised as amongst the finest in the world and has been used countless times as gifts for royalty and visiting dignitaries. Its golden age was the Victorian period when firms introduced a dazzling array of cameo, coloured glass and crystal that equalled the best in the world.

 

 
   

Did you know that the first locomotive to run in America was built in Stourbridge? 180 years ago, the town's ironworks produced two locomotives that earned their place in history: ‘America’ and The Stourbridge Lion.’ The Lion was so-named because someone painting the boiler front noticed dents which reminded him of a lion's head. So, the locomotive was from Stourbridge was named the 'Stourbridge Lion'.

 

 

 

 

 

Embracing the fullness of life, embedded in a Christian ethos of caring and sharing.
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